University of Jordan student Yazan Salman at work on the Sixth International Sculpture Biennial.

In June, twenty-eight artists from Australia, Bahrain, France, German, Iraq, Jordan, Oman, Morocco, Palestine, Spain and Sweden took part in the Sixth International Sculpture Biennial held at the University of Jordan in Amman. The Biennial is organised by the Jordan National Gallery of Fine Arts, the University of Jordan and Amman Municipality.

As part of this year’s Biennial, the visiting sculptors, along with ten students from the University’s Department of Fine Art, were asked to use the remains of oak and cypress trees, felled by a severe storm that struck last December, to create works of art. Over 1000 tonnes of wood were felled by the storm and out of this over fifty sculptures were created. These are now being shown around Amman and at the National Gallery in the Jabal al-Weibdeh district of Amman.

No specific theme was given to the sculptors, which led to a variety of subjects and styles. One of the artists taking part, Anne Hille from Germany, described her sculpture, Rising Memories, as an attempt to explore the idea of trees being repositories of history and memory. For student Yazan Salman, the theme was the relationship between women and the land in which they live.

According to Salman events like this are important in Jordan as, ‘they help promote art and strengthen the bond between people and art.’

Main image: University of Jordan student Yazan Salman at work on the Sixth International Sculpture Biennial (photo: © Michael Paraskos)